Archive for Medieval Prosopography

ISSN: 1936-1181

A series in PDF format devoted to the persons and institutions of the Middle Ages as a vehicle for understanding significant developments in law, society, and regional identity; topics relating to constitutional evolution, interregional politics, and local manifestations of government, as well as sub-disciplines such as genealogy, chronology, sigillography, numismatics, etc.

No. 1 – The Konradiner and Their Hessian Heirs: An Annotated Table by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 2 – Ius hereditarium Encountered I: The Meingaud-Walaho Inheritance by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 3 – Ius hereditarium Encountered II: Approaches to Reginlint by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 4 – Ius hereditarium Encountered III: Ezzo’s Chess Match by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 5 – Gerhard Flamens (Part One) by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 6 – Three Bernards Sent South to Govern I: Southern Marks in Carolingian France by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 7 – Hochstaden: Public Succession in Ripuaria of the High Middle Ages by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 8 – Ius hereditarium Compassed: The comitatus nemoris in 1177 and 1207 by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 9 – Geldern, Looz, and Public Succession by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 10 – Canes palatini: Dynastic Transplantation and the Souvenir of St. Simeon by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 11 – The Kleeberg Fragment of the Gleiberg County by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 12 – Three Bernards Sent South to Govern II: Counties of the Guilhemid Consanguinity by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 13 – Studia Luxembourgensia by Donald C. Jackman   

No. 14 – Gerhard Flamens (Part Two) by Donald C. Jackman   

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No. 1 – The Konradiner and Their Hessian Heirs: An Annotated Table by Donald C. Jackman – vi, 76 pp., large table – PDF format – 2nd printing* – $10.00

A large-scale genealogical table details the family relationships of over 120 persons covering 8 generations of the most widespread and important Frankish aristocratic family of the German central middle ages (circa 850-1050). The text serves as a guide to the basis of affiliations in argumentation drawing on disparate and problematical source materials.

Rather than repeat source citations and discussions pertaining to this widely investigated family, the survey concentrates on providing orientation to the academic literature where definitive source discussion occurs. The evolution of counties is followed from the heyday of the post-Carolingian pagus to the birth of fragmented dynastic principalities. The Hammerstein family, the last historically established Konradiner line in Hessen, receives special focus.

 

No. 2 – Ius hereditarium Encountered I: The Meingaud-Walaho Inheritance by Donald C. Jackman – viii, 107 pp., 2 large tables – PDF format – 2nd printing* – $10.00

The introductory component of the tripartite “Ius Hereditarium Encountered” describes the Meingaud-Walaho inheritance that transpired in or around 906, as well as several closely connected ninth-century comital successions in the middle Rhenish region. In addressing the many and various aspects of the Meingaud-Walaho inheritance, a fairly comprehensive picture of the origin of the Salian imperial dynasty emerges.

Compelling explanations are achieved for the complex origins of the Salian duchy of Worms and its eventual absorption in the Rhenish palatinate. Interpretation of comital succession based on reliably inferred affiliations leads to a general understanding of principles of succession during the Carolingian period, and to an appreciation of the profound vitality of inheritance in public office, a hitherto poorly understood stage of constitutional development preceding feudal dynasticism.
 

 

No. 3 – Ius hereditarium Encountered II: Approaches to Reginlint by Donald C. Jackman – viii, 103 pp., 2 large tables – PDF format – 2nd printing* – $10.00

The middle component of the tripartite “Ius Hereditarium Encountered” addresses the question of inherited right in the birth of the Swabian duchy in the second decade of the tenth century. Burkhard I and Hermann I, the first two dukes of Swabia, were husbands in succession of Reginlint, and our perception therefore is that Reginlint’s right brought the ducal office to her husbands in turn. Can this be demonstrated?

In the course of this investigation, neglected source evidence sheds light on the throne-right of the Lambertiner emperors and the Rudolfine kings of Burgundy; on the disgrace of Bishop Liutward of Vercelli; and on the heirs of the old Alemannian dukes.

 

No. 4 – Ius hereditarium Encountered III: Ezzo’s Chess Match by Donald C. Jackman – viii, 109 pp. – PDF format – 2nd printing* – $10.00

The third and final component of “Ius Hereditarium Encountered” is focused around the chess match by which Count Palatine Ezzo allegedly won the hand of the imperial princess Mathilde in the early 990s. The directly contemporary Capetian succession in France reveals similar issues of throne-right in the post-Carolingian world.

This paper discusses neglected source evidence definitively documenting the fact that tenth-century descendants of the Carolingians were far more numerous than is generally understood. Ezzo may have won Mathilde’s hand in a chess match, but clearly he had already been identified as the appropriate groom by virtue of his place in the imperial consanguinity.
 

 

No. 5 – Gerhard Flamens (Part One) by Donald C. Jackman – iv, 49 pp. – PDF format – $5.00

The witness list in Emperor Henry IV’s diploma of 1101 for Andenne is subjected to discourse analysis, a method of applied linguistics. Here, and in a private document for Rees from 1138/9, a close relationship between the counts of Geldern and Looz becomes apparent. Many sources, including the description of Gerhard Flamensconsanguinity in the Annales Rodenses, coalesce around this reconstruction.

The term ‘flamens’ is equated with ‘flaminius’, which evidently concerns the battle standard of Cologne. The standard-bearer’s office – occasionally referred to as a landgravate – passed from Gerhard Flamens († 1067) to Count Gerhard of Hochstaden, who in 1086 forfeited it to his sister’s son, Gerhard of Geldern, whose wife was Emperor Henry’s first cousin.

 

No. 6 – Three Bernards Sent South to Govern I: Southern Marks in Carolingian France by Donald C. Jackmanin paperback

The two-part study of the Bernards (see also AMP, no 12) carries the “Ius hereditarium Encountered” project westward, demonstrating the existence of a law of heritability in public offices and describe its workings in the nascent French realm. Part One includes discussions of methodology, aspects of heritability peculiar to France, the margravial offices associated with the Bernards, facets of the Bernards’ identities, and an exploration of succession in the Septimanian mark and its subdivisions during the first several decades of the Catalonian reconquista.

Approximately half of the study is devoted to the reconstruction of Septimanian margravial families. The role of the Etichonen and their close relatives in southern France has not hitherto been observed, but can be confirmed across a wide range of situations. In a number of instances, highly accurate affiliations are reconstructed. Insight is generated into connections with Asturian royalty and paths of descent from the last Visigothic kings.

 

No. 7 – Hochstaden: Public Succession in Ripuaria of the High Middle Ages by Donald C. Jackman – viii, 96 pp. – PDF format – 5th printing* – $10.00 – contents

In Ripuaria of the high middle ages the comital title always passed from one individual to another, and was never divided to accommodate more than one individual. The titles stemming from the old pagi can for the most part be followed to great effect. The early counts of Hochstaden appear to have been involved at one time or another with six distinct counties based on Ripuarian pagi. These passed in various ways, but always according to a principle of unitary succession.

An eloquent case is made for the descent of the counts of Sayn in the male line from the early Hochstaden counts, including a wide range of evidence supporting precise identities and affiliations. This study also looks at the landgravial office that is explicitly documented for Count Gerhard I of Geldern in an imperial diploma of 1098.

 

No. 8 – Ius hereditarium Compassed: The comitatus nemoris in 1177 and 1207 by Donald C. Jackman – iv, 27 pp. – PDF format – 3rd printing*free

In 1177 the county of Molbach was united with the county of Jülich through the marriage of the heiress, Alberada of Molbach, with Count William II of Jülich. The couple remained childless for thirty years. In 1207 the combined counties of Molbach and Jülich passed to William II's nephew William of Hengebach. It is commonly believed that this was an arbitrary succession, where the rights of Alberada, who survived and remarried, were simply trampled on.

In this vignette it is demonstrated with varied and extensive evidence that William of Hengebach’s paternal grandmother was a sister of Alberada of Molbach’s father. Far from being an obvious demonstration of an arbitrary “rule of the fist,” the Molbach-Jülich succession of 1207 is a poster child for the juristic conception of lawful public succession.

 

No. 9 – Geldern, Looz, and Public Succession by Donald C. Jackman – x, 111 pp. large table – PDF format – 2nd printing* – $10.00 – contents

This study offers a comprehensive rebuttal to objections voiced in the literature regarding the inferable fraternal relationship between Counts Gerhard I of Geldern and Arnold I of Looz as presented in AMP, no. 5. It then explores the ancestry shared in common by the parents of these persons. Finally, it offers a general description of principles of succession operative in Lower Lorraine during the troubled tenth century.

Considerable precision is achieved on particular questions, beginning with a debunking of the bizarre assertions of Vanderkindere (1903) about the marriages of Countess Ermengarde (fl. 1078). A genuinely precise affiliation is provided for descent of the dynasty of Brabant from the Ansfrieds of the tenth century. Conversely, a full reconstruction of the descent of the Ansfrieds from the Balderics could not be achieved, although the existence of such descent is vigorously defended.

 

No. 10 – Canes palatini: Dynastic Transplantation and the Souvenir of St. Simeon by Donald C. Jackman – vi, 70 pp. – PDF format – $10.00 – contents

A chronicle source hitherto entirely overlooked sheds light on the aristocratic associations of the foundation of St. Simeon’s church in Trier. A chapel dedicated to Stephen, companion of the anchorite Simeon of Syracuse († 1035), is thought to have been founded in 1337, but can now be traced back almost to the lifetime of Simeon, whose last days were spent at the Porta Nigra in Trier. A monastery of St. Simeon founded at Kiev in the late eleventh century seems also to have this same saint as its patron.

The name Simon, a Latin version of Simeon, spread among the related families of the counts of Saarbrücken and dukes of Lorraine. In both lineages a personal acquaintance with St. Simeon is very likely. The extent of information on the family connections between these two dynasties is explored. Clear patterns of Greco-Roman onomastic inheritance provide confirmation for a set of inferred relationships involving the Salian and Staufer emperors.

 

No. 11 – The Kleeberg Fragment of the Gleiberg County by Donald C. Jackman – viii, 120 pp. – PDF format – $10.00 – contents

This study is devoted to aspects of the conflicted hereditary landscape following the reign of the anti-king Hermann († 1088). In the aftermath of the papal-imperial schism both his heirs and his adversaries (those to whom he had technically forfeited) needed to be honored in their claims, leading to obscure and problematical inheritances and some noteworthy problems of historical reconstruction.

The existence of a close relationship between the anti-king Hermann and Count Palatine Henry of Laach is well documented, but its precise nature has baffled historians. Part One provides a definitive answer to that central question. In establishing the paths along which Hermann’s inheritance traveled, Part Two brings a wide range of details concerning the aristocracy and its law into focus.

 

No. 12 – Three Bernards Sent South to Govern II: Counties of the Guilhemid Consanguinity by Donald C. Jackmanin paperback

Part Two of the study of the Bernards (see also AMP, no. 6) presents the train of argument leading to the establishment of precise genealogical connections between the several Bernards. The reliable affiliation of Count Bernard (I) of Auvergne as brother of Count Isembard of Autun provides an imposing case for the existence of a fundamental law of hereditary succession in French counties of the ninth century.

Further material pertaining directly to comital succession in the context of the Bernards then follows. It is possible to trace the rights of Gerard of Lyon and Boso of Provence with considerable effect. The descent of Bernard of Gothia and the early counts of Poitiers from Count Abbo (778) is shown, along with the latter’s membership in the Cancorid lineage. Insights into the connections of St. William of Gellone include projections of his and his successor Bego’s multiple relationship with the Carolingian monarchs.

 

No. 13 – Studia Luxembourgensia by Donald C. Jackman – viii, 94 pp., large table – PDF format – $10.00 – contents

The earliest counts of Luxembourg have been studied on numerous occasions, but a satisfactory reconstruction of relationships has been elusive. Through an intensive application of principles of terminological extension in Latin terms of relationship, of onomastic inheritance, and of customary law as applied to questions of forbidden marital consanguinity, a thorough solution to the central problems can be achieved.

This study demonstrates that Siegfried of Luxembourg († c. 1000) was in all probability an adoptive brother, not a full brother, of Bishop Adalbero I of Metz. It also shows that Siegfried’s son Henry documents as duke of Lower Lorraine before becoming duke of Bavaria. A number of possibilities emerge for identifying ancestors of the Luxembourgs in the three or four generations preceding Siegfried.

 

No. 14 – Gerhard Flamens (Part Two) by Donald C. Jackman – iv, 56 pp. – PDF format – $5.00

Gerhard Flamens was not a Flamand, but rather the flaminius, or bearer of the flamen, the battle standard of Cologne. A Geldrian seal of 1207 provides sufficient detail for a clear picture of the battle standard. By the mid-thirteenth century the counts of Geldern shared their heraldic shield with the counts of Nassau. The latter occasionally document as standard bearers of Cologne, beginning in the 1180s if not earlier.

The counts of Geldern were only one of a wide variety of comital dynasties descending from Gerhard Flamens and his siblings. This study seeks to reconstruct the successions of counts in Keldagau and Zülpichgau (to complete the discussion initated in no. 7) and to elucidate lines that stood in close relationship with Emperor Lothar of Supplinburg, whose ancestors undoubtedly included a sister of Gerhard Flamens.

*corrigit errata

 

 

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